Red Madonna

This one is an old one, a homage to Byzantine icons which I love – I’m going to have to load up 3, and display as a set, in order to allow the images to be seen at intended size, I don’t know why WP is doing this to me, but hey  ho!

 

Clickey 🙂

 

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41 thoughts on “Red Madonna

    • Thanks Mia, glad you like it! I just love those old churches in places like Italy and Scilly in particular I think that has these huge icons painted or done in mosaics, I mean more like the first one of course, the other 2 are a bit more spooky than one would find above an altar, unless you were visiting a rather odd church with satanic leanings! (But I only posted those 2, because its the only way to show the images as clickable expanded) There’s a lot of detail there which can’t be viewed at smaller sizes! 🙂

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      • I’m pretty clueless at the moment about what to do next, I was looking at a book on Hieronymus Bosch the other day, I keep going back to it, I love stuff like that, but its really hard to be that inventive, I just do any old thing mostly, but there’s loads I wouldn’t consider, ordinarily, but even I would “go there” if I got the urge! Its follow the aardvark, or some inner weeble – I like to think idea will come to me, but then if they don’t, I get distressed about that, I could do with a better plan, but I never had one! Xxx

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      • Hieronymus Bosch, fantastic stuff! My favorite is, “The Garden of Earthly Delights” although, “The Last Judgment” is great too! Sparks of inspiration always come, it’s just that sometimes they’re spaced out a bit. I am looking forward to see what you do next, what ever direction you decide to go in. xo

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      • I was just looking at Gerhard Richter, he seems t go from one thing to another, I find hat really refreshing, its such a drag to be in a box, he’s like a jumping bean!

        Check out this book on Bosch, its got to be just about the most awesome art book ever! It sells for about £60, tho I have seen it around £45, and was very tempted! Oh man, I wish I had that book!!! 🙂 XXo

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      • Gerhard Richter, terrific. His painting are going for astronomical prices. I love what he does with color, or how he removes color. 😉 Thank you for the link. Ogden, you don’t have the book? She said £100, you found it for £45, that’s a deal. 🙂 xo

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      • Its hovering around £60. now, prices fluctuate, especially art books, depends on availability, supply and demand, you have to be careful with this one, cos they brought out a smaller version minus the gatefolds, that one can be got for about £20, I’d like to have it just as a curiosity really, Bosch is so unique! There’s an old video on utube with some American expert explains all the symbolism, made it his life’s work – he says back then they really believed all this stuff, or were at least familiar with the concepts in that particular area of Belgium (I think it is, or Holland?) Swans mean such and such, and birds, he talked about how back then Birds were considered evil! Birds!! I suppose back then everything meant something in creation, it all being there for some reason or other – pretty crazy! Also, they were familiar with a lot of suffering, both inflicted and diseases and so on, I just love the inventions. I wonder if it was all so common, why isn’t there much more like it from the period? Either its disappeared, while Bosch’s has survived due to patronage, or else I wonder if Bosch was sort of taking the mickey a little? I often think the artists tend to be the less devout among us, being creative tends to lead to a certain kind of self belief through exploration?

        Yes, I’m sure it was Richters work I found a decade or so ago and liked – not many artists here in the UK have that kind of approach, dealers see something they like, and say, do more like that! Its a winner! I see a lot of German art I admire, its a tradition going back to the neo expressionist era, I think its a good influence! I like all sorts of stuff, the Pre-Rapaelites, they’re ok, I don’t care if people think its twee, its good painting! I like Whistler, Turner, John Martin, what a head case! Brilliant tho! (Saw a good exhibition on him) I don’t know how people find the time to do 20 or so paintings measuring 25 feet across, takes me months to do little ones. Anselm Kiefer is brilliant, but way out of my IQ league, he gets people to build his works for him while I toil away on some frivolous little thing out of my own brain, by comparison he circumnavigates the world, or has a team to do it for him while he just hands some notes to an assistant for another project! The art world is bonkers, I’d only want to be involved on my own terms, Richter appears to have that side of things nailed 🙂 xx

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      • Ogden, I think Bosch was a surrealist before the terms was even coined. Oh yes, everything was very symbolic, I wonder if that was the Greek influence, surely not the Church. Don’t most artist tend to think just a bit differently, as you mentioned outside the box? You seem to have had some great exposure to art and many different artists working in different styles and mediums. I like Anselm Kiefer, his work is very conceptual. I hope you’ve been thinking about your next project, I’m looking forward to viewing it! xo

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      • Thats an interesting theory Mia, especially the Greeks idea, I don’t know much about them tho. Now I got to watching that documentary again on utube, its a really good one!

        I went and did a degree in fine art when I was 30, also studied art history and art therapy, so thats when I first got interested in understanding contemporary art, for the course really, but I liked art history better than anything, it gave me a grounding in the world at large, I’d been somewhat adrift I suppose, just wandering thru life angrily mostly not understanding anything – “the naked ape” or whatever!

        Hmm, I have been thinking about some dark thoughts, shadows of the past and archaic predictions of further terrors yet to come, but also polka-dots seem appealing, or flowers or something, as I’m in love, off and on, I loved Kiefer’s flying lead books, awesome idea! I like to explore the feminine side as I perceive it, Kiefer is a bit heavyweight for me, I always meant to read up on him, but I imagine it would be rather like reading Joyce’s Ulysses, then having to spend another 6yrs studying to unravel all the references.

        Well I shall sure come up with something sooner or later, I tend to go with whatever happens in the moment, but first that moment has to be percieved in order for the brain to recognise it I expect, I’m looking forward to it now, so something must be brewing! 🙂 Xx

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      • I might as well confess, I was just looking thru a list of German artists, cos I wasn’t even sure it was Gerhart Richter I liked so much or someone else! I saw something I liked, a few things I liked, by a German artist about 10yrs ago and always meant to look into it all further, so it could have been someone else, I can’t find whatever it was that struck me so hard back then, it probably WAS him, and I just can’t find that original inspired piece. I’m no expert of German art, I see many of those on the list I was browsing also do photography, quite interesting that so many of them cross over like that, it happens here too, but I just wonder if its a more German tradition in the art schools there. Anyhow, I have no idea, so don’t quote me, if I say (for instance) it all springs from neo expressionism, thats just my frame of reference – anyhow, been enjoying looking around at that corner of the web 🙂

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      • Kind of you to confess. There is a lot of crossover in any particular style, I think that often it’s easy for several different artists to have their work look very similar, especially if they are contemporaries, how could they not be influenced by the work of each other. 🙂

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      • Ogden, I watched the documentary, “The Mysteries of Hieronymus Bosch”, with Nicholas Baum. I got a kick out of it being so vintage, other than that, it’s fantastic film and I learned so much. I was way off, yes his style is indeed surreal, although not entirely sure it was his intent, but he turned out to be a God fearing man, very surprising.

        Thank you for sharing some of your background. Oh yes, I completely agree, I have a love of art and art history. “Archaic predictions” and “polka-dots’ an interesting combination, I adore polka-dots, and predictions too. Predictions often tend to falter, unless they are vague in their nature, and then we can say “see”. But history does repeat itself, it’s very predictable that way.

        Wishing you a wonderful evening, please enjoy your Sunday. ~ Mia xo

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      • Oh, so glad you enjoyed that- it was a rather special program! I don’t know why I thought Nicholas Baum was American, I think his accent is probably English, but maybe spent time someplace abroad. Yes, the vintage aspect of it was a treat too!

        Bosch sure was an astonishing character! And thats an understatement! Got to love that whole school of Bosch too, the Bruegel’s, I saw some of their work in Belgium one time, in a small(ish) provincial house we visited, the Belgians are great for orange surrealness, also visited the Magritte museum there, which was great 🙂

        Have you heard of Félicien Rops? This is a bit off the beaten path, but I found his pictures often deeply moving, (L’enterrement au pays gallon,) as well as surreal, naughty, fun. There is a Félicien Rops in Belgium I’d like to visit some day.

        Have a good weekend 🙂 XX

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      • It was, thank you again for the link. Agreed, it’s an understatement, I can’t help but wonder why so much of Bosch’s work was lost. How great that you have seem some of the mentioned artwork in person. I have heard of Félicien Rops, I’ve been exposed to some of his work, but I can’t say I’m familiar-familiar with him. What I’ve seen has been surreal and definitely most memorable. Have a wonderful Sunday Ogden. ~ Mia 🙂 xo

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      • Well don’t forget its 500yrs since Bosch was working – thats a long time, it surprising as much did survive really, considering all the changes in beliefs and styles of Christianity since then!

        There’s a town in Belgium called Namur, where there is a Rops museum, the town itself is a walled city (if I remember rightly) so its a good tourist attraction with a castle and cathedral etc, I have considered visiting as its not far for me. (I used to have a thing about Paul Klee -theres’ a Klee foundation in Switzerland I think I wanted to go to) I went to Vienna and saw the Klimt stuff there, a lot of it is murals, so you can’t see them unless you go there, it made for a nice break 🙂

        I think there is a Rothko Chapel in Texas, its nowhere near me, but it nearer you than me, so you guys have your treats too, course there’s tons of stuff to see over there – Anyhow, nice to chat 🙂 Have a good week 😀 XX

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    • Thanks Paula, your right there, I can’t remember now why I started that image, but I always thought of it as one of my better ones, something about the “everywoman” nature of the icons, the full face view, she has such a presence – I like the way the surface looks aged too, it just adds more to her! 🙂

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    • Oh yes, I was always fond of this one! I did it a good few yrs ago, but never got even near finished with it, so I pulled it up the other day and had another go, and found my abilities have improved, thus I was able to do more 🙂

      There ae some madly good mahoosive icons in some old churches and chapels in Italy (which I have seen on TV) They create a dominating presence in those spaces, I expect the worshippers who go there are haunted by that intense stare! Perhaps they fall in love, or perhaps the face simply terrifies, (they are usually of Christ, not Mary). I dug the pre-raphaelites stuff, Lizzie Siddal has that classical red haired beauty thing going on, her wiki page is a good bit of gothic reading. If I’d been around in Victorian times you can rest assured Rossetti and I would have come to a duel! Dammit, those Victorians were fiends!!!

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      • That helps with old writing, too. Some of my best work was resurrected from the dead! I was reading up on Lizzie…how fascinating. She could have died from “Fowler’s solution,” a potion to improve complexion made of diluted arsenic. Oh, the things we women do for beauty!

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      • Jesus! check out these lyrics! Talk about morbid!!
        Moribund! LOL

        And what costume shall the poor girl wear
        To all tomorrow’s parties
        A hand-me-down dress from who knows where
        To all tomorrow’s parties
        And where will she go, and what shall she do
        When midnight comes around
        She’ll turn once more to Sunday’s clown and cry behind the door
        And what costume shall the poor girl wear
        To all tomorrow’s parties
        Why silks and linens of yesterday’s gowns
        To all tomorrow’s parties
        And what will she do with Thursday’s rags
        When Monday comes around
        She’ll turn once more to Sunday’s clown and cry behind the door
        And what costume shall the poor girl wear
        To all tomorrow’s parties
        For Thursday’s child is Sunday’s clown
        For whom none will go mourning
        A blackened shroud
        A hand-me-down gown
        Of rags and silks, a costume
        Fit for one who sits and cries
        For all tomorrow’s parties

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  1. Nico had “an enduring love of nature, and also graveyards” – now that’s my kinda gal! And damn, what a bohemian babe. I’d like to read a whole biography sometime. That’s a hell of a lot to cram into one life. Thanks for the link and recommendation! ❤

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